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Lactational Response of Dairy Cows to Increased Dietary Crude Protein with Added Fat1

  • Author Footnotes
    2 Present address: Dairy Science Department, Chungnan National University, Taejeon 305-764, Republic of Korea.
    Y.K. Kim
    Footnotes
    2 Present address: Dairy Science Department, Chungnan National University, Taejeon 305-764, Republic of Korea.
    Affiliations
    Dairy Science Department, South Dakota State University, Brookings 57007-0647
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  • Author Footnotes
    3 Reprint requests.
    D.J. Schingoethe
    Footnotes
    3 Reprint requests.
    Affiliations
    Dairy Science Department, South Dakota State University, Brookings 57007-0647
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  • Author Footnotes
    4 Present address: Ruminant Nutrition Laboratory, ARS-USDA, Beltsville, MD 20705.
    D.P. Casper
    Footnotes
    4 Present address: Ruminant Nutrition Laboratory, ARS-USDA, Beltsville, MD 20705.
    Affiliations
    Dairy Science Department, South Dakota State University, Brookings 57007-0647
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  • F.C. Ludens
    Affiliations
    Dairy Science Department, South Dakota State University, Brookings 57007-0647
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 Publisbed with approval of the director of the South Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station as Publication Number 2559 of the Journal Series.
    2 Present address: Dairy Science Department, Chungnan National University, Taejeon 305-764, Republic of Korea.
    3 Reprint requests.
    4 Present address: Ruminant Nutrition Laboratory, ARS-USDA, Beltsville, MD 20705.
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      Abstract

      Thirty-six Holstein cows were assigned to one of three diets containing soybean meal (16% CP), added fat from extruded soybeans (16% CP), and added fat and protein from extruded soybeans plus soybean meal (18% CP) to determine whether feeding additional protein would prevent the depression in milk protein percentages usually experienced when cows are fed additional fat. Total mixed diets containing 25% corn silage, 25% alfalfa hay, and 50% of respective concentrate mixtures were fed individually wk 4 through 16 postpartum; pretreatment (wk 3 postpartum), milk production, and composition data were used as covariates. Milk production (33.0, 35.8, and 34.2 kg/d) was higher for cows fed added fat. Milk protein (2.92, 2.88, and 2.83%) and casein (2.16, 2.13, and 2.09%) tended to decrease for cows fed added fat and did not increase with higher dietary protein. Dry matter intakes (20.9, 20.7, and 19.8 kg/d) and BW were similar for all diets. Supplementing additional CP to a diet containing added fat did not prevent depression in milk protein percentage.

      Key words

      Abbreviation key:

      AV (arteriovenous), ESB-16 (extruded soybean diet, 16% CP), ESB-18 (extruded soybean diet, 18% CP), SBM-16 (soybean meal diet, 16% CP)

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