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Mozzarella Cheese: Impact of Coagulant Type on Functional Properties1

  • J. Joseph Yun
    Affiliations
    Northeast Dairy Foods Research Center, Department of Food Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853
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  • Author Footnotes
    2 Department of Animal and Food Science, University of Vermont, Burlington 05405.
    L. Joseph Kiely
    Footnotes
    2 Department of Animal and Food Science, University of Vermont, Burlington 05405.
    Affiliations
    Northeast Dairy Foods Research Center, Department of Food Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853
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  • Author Footnotes
    2 Department of Animal and Food Science, University of Vermont, Burlington 05405.
    Paul S. Kindstedt
    Footnotes
    2 Department of Animal and Food Science, University of Vermont, Burlington 05405.
    Affiliations
    Northeast Dairy Foods Research Center, Department of Food Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853
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  • David M. Barbano
    Affiliations
    Northeast Dairy Foods Research Center, Department of Food Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 Use of trade names, names of ingredients, and identification of specific models of equipment is for scientific clarity and does not constitute any endorsement of product by the authors, Cornell University, University of Vermont, or the Northeast Dairy Foods Research Center.
    2 Department of Animal and Food Science, University of Vermont, Burlington 05405.
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      Abstract

      The objective of this study was to determine the impact of coagulant type and refrigerated storage on functional properties of unmelted and melted Mozzarella cheese. A “no-brine” Mozzarella cheese-making method was used to produce cheese with homogeneous chemical composition. Cultured Mozzarella cheeses were made with three different coagulants (Endothia parasitica protease, chymosin derived by fermentation, and Mucor miehei protease) in 1 d, and cheese making was replicated on 3 different d. During 50 d of storage at 4°C, texture profile analysis parameters (hardness, cohesiveness, and springiness) of unmelted cheese decreased, meltability increased, apparent viscosity of melted cheese decreased, and free oil formation from melted cheese increased. Overall, the Mozzarella cheese made using E. parasitica protease was softer in unmelted cheese texture, was more meltable, and had lower apparent viscosity and more free oil release on melting than other cheese. In general, cheeses made with chymosin and Mucor miehei protease were similar in functional characteristics.

      Key words

      Abbreviation key:

      AV (apparent viscosity), CDF (chymosin derived by fermentation), TPA (texture profile analysis)

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