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Article| Volume 80, ISSUE 8, P1537-1545, August 1997

Improvement of Lactose Digestion by Humans Following Ingestion of Unfermented Acidophilus Milk: Influence of Bile Sensitivity, Lactose Transport, and Acid Tolerance of Lactobacillus acidophilus

  • Azlin Mustapha
    Affiliations
    Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, University of Missouri, Columbia 65211
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  • Tianan Jiang
    Affiliations
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Iowa, Iowa City 52242
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 Send correspondence to D. A. Savaiano, Purdue University, School of Consumer and Family Sciences, 1260 Stone Hall Room 110, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1260.
    Dennis A. Savaiano
    Footnotes
    1 Send correspondence to D. A. Savaiano, Purdue University, School of Consumer and Family Sciences, 1260 Stone Hall Room 110, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1260.
    Affiliations
    School of Consumer and Family Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    1 Send correspondence to D. A. Savaiano, Purdue University, School of Consumer and Family Sciences, 1260 Stone Hall Room 110, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1260.
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      Abstract

      The influence of bile sensitivity, lactose transport, and acid tolerance of Lactobacillus acidophilus on in vivo digestion of lactose was investigated. Four strains of L. acidophilus exhibiting varied degrees of lactose transport, β-galactosidase activity, and bile sensitivity were used to prepare unfermented acidophilus milks. Lactose malabsorption was evaluated by measuring breath H2 excretion of 11 lactose maldigesting subjects following ingestion of four acidophilus test milks. Test meals were fed in a randomized double-blind protocol. Consumption of acidophilus milk (2% fat) containing strains B, N1, and E significantly reduced mean total H2 production compared with that of the control reduced-fat (2% fat) milk, but milk containing strain ATCC 4356 did not differ from the control. Acidophilus milk containing L. acidophilus N1 was the most effective of the four acidophilus milks in improving lactose digestion and tolerance. Strain N1 exhibited the lowest β-galactosidase activity and lactose transport but the greatest bile and acid tolerance of the four strains. The results indicated that bile and acid tolerance may be important factors to consider when L. acidophilus strains are selected for improving lactose digestion and tolerance.

      Key words

      Abbreviation Key:

      A (absorbance (used with subscript indicating wavelength in nanometers)), β-GAL (β-galactosidase), 4356 milk (unfermented acidophilus milk made with Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356), B milk (unfermented acidophilus milk made with L. acidophilus B), E milk (unfermented acidophilus milk made with L. acidophilus E), N1 milk (unfermented acidophilus milk made with L. acidophilus N1)

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